Medical monitoring hub

Abstract

The present disclosure includes a medical monitoring hub as the center of monitoring for a monitored patient. The hub includes configurable medical ports and serial ports for communicating with other medical devices in the patient's proximity. Moreover, the hub communicates with a portable patient monitor. The monitor, when docked with the hub provides display graphics different from when undocked, the display graphics including anatomical information. The hub assembles the often vast amount of electronic medical data, associates it with the monitored patient, and in some embodiments, communicates the data to the patient's medical records.

Claims

1 . A medical monitoring hub configured to monitor physiological parameters of a single patient, the hub comprising: a removable docking station configured to physically and electrically communicate with a portable patient monitor; a plurality of processors; a display sized approximately a height of the portable patient monitor; and a plurality of communication ports configured to accept data from other electronic devices associated with the patient. 2 . The hub of claim 1 , wherein said docking station comprises a plurality of docking stations, each station shaped to physically mate with a different shaped portable patient monitor. 3 . The hub of claim 1 , wherein said removable docking station comprises a first docking station that physically mates with at least a portion of a housing of said portable patient monitor. 4 . The hub of claim 1 , wherein when electrically docked with said hub, the portable patient monitor changes its display indicia from displayed parameter information to graphical information. 5 . The hub of claim 4 , wherein said graphical information comprises anatomical graphical information. 6 . The hub of claim 5 , where said anatomical graphical information is animated. 7 . The hub of claim 6 , wherein said animation is responsive to said monitored parameters. 8 . The hub of claim 7 , wherein said responsiveness comprises behaving similar to the behavior of an associated portion of said patient. 9 . The hub of claim 5 , wherein said anatomical graphical information comprises some or all of a circulatory system. 10 . The hub of claim 5 , wherein said anatomical graphical information comprises some or all of a respiratory system. 11 . The hub of claim 5 , wherein said anatomical graphical information comprises a brain. 12 . The hub of claim 5 , wherein said anatomical graphical information comprises an organ. 13 . The hub of claim 5 , wherein said anatomical graphical information comprises some or all of a gastrointestinal system. 14 . The hub of claim 5 , wherein said anatomical graphical information indicates severity of monitored parameters associated with the graphical information. 15 . The hub of claim 4 , wherein said graphical information indicates severity of monitored parameters associated with the graphical information. 16 . The hub of claim 1 , wherein one or more of said communication ports comprises a channel port. 17 . The hub of claim 16 , wherein said channel port provides optional non-isolated power. 18 . The hub of claim 17 , wherein said non-isolated power comprises a plurality of power levels. 19 . The hub of claim 17 , wherein said port comprises a connector and wherein said connector includes a non-linear path between isolated and non-isolated conductors. 20 . The hub of claim 17 , wherein said port comprises a connector and wherein a distance between an isolated conductor and a non-isolated conductor is shorter than a periphery of the cable connector housing between said conductors. 21 . The hub of claim 16 , wherein said channel port communicates with a memory in said connector to configure the hub to receive data without reprogramming software of said hub. 22 . The hub of claim 16 , wherein said hub is configured to reorganize information on said display to include data from said channel ports when said other electronic device is connected thereto. 23 . The hub of claim 1 , comprising one or more processors that incorporate said data and create virtual data channels responsive to said data. 24 . The hub of claim 1 , wherein information on said display comprises analog gages showing measurement data, said analog gages comprising an arc. 25 . The hub of claim 1 , wherein information on said display comprises overlapping data of different parameters. 26 . The hub of claim 1 , wherein one or more of said communication ports comprises a serial port. 27 . The hub of claim 1 , wherein said hub communicates directly with one or more medical sensors. 28 . A medical monitoring hub configured to monitor physiological parameters of a single patient, the hub comprising: a plurality of communication ports configured to accept data from a plurality of electronic devices monitoring a single patient; a display; and a housing positioning said display and said communication ports. 29 . A method of displaying measurement information on a display responsive to an output of a medical device, the method comprising: receiving information from a connected output cable of a medical device at a computing device including a display; determining a format of data to be provided on said output cable from said information; adjusting said display based on said information; and receiving said data over said output cable. 30 . A method of associating data from disparate medical devices with a patient being monitored, the method comprising: designating a patient on a medical device; receiving data at said medical device from a plurality of different medical devices, each device monitoring said patient or associated with said patient at a monitoring facility; and associating said data with said patient. 31 . The method of claim 30 , wherein said designating comprises selecting from a list of patients at said caregiver facility, said list acquired from said facility's electronic devices. 32 . The method of claim 30 , comprising outputting said data associated with said patient to a medical server. 33 . The method of claim 30 , wherein said receiving data comprises receiving data for a first time from said disparate medical device without upgrading software on said medical device or said disparate medical device. 34 . The method of claim 30 , wherein said receiving data comprises configuring a medical port from information received from a memory in a connector to said medical port from said disparate medical device. 35 . A method of configuring a medical communication port with power, the method comprising: receiving data configuration information from a connector designed to mechanically and electrically mate with a medical port on a medical device; when said information indicates a desire for isolated power, providing isolated power; and when said information indicates a desire for non-isolated power, providing non-isolated power.
PRIORITY CLAIM AND RELATED APPLICATIONS [0001] This application claims a priority benefit under 35 U.S.C. §119 to the following U.S. Provisional Patent Applications: [0000] Serial No. Date Title 61/547,017, Oct. 13, 2011, Visual Correlation of Physiological Information, 61/547,577, Oct. 14, 2011, Visual Correlation of Physiological Information, 61/597,120, Feb. 9, 2012, Visual Correlation of Physiological Information, and. 61/703,773 Sep. 20, 2012 Medical Monitoring Hub [0002] Each of the foregoing disclosures is incorporated by reference herein in its entirety. FIELD OF THE DISCLOSURE [0003] The present disclosure relates generally to patient monitoring devices and specifically to a patient monitor and medical data communication hub. BACKGROUND OF THE DISCLOSURE [0004] Today's patient monitoring environments are crowded with sophisticated and often electronic medical devices servicing a wide variety of monitoring and treatment endeavors for a given patient. Generally, many if not all of the devices are from differing manufactures, and many may be portable devices. The devices may not communicate with one another and each may include its own control, display, alarms, configurations and the like. Complicating matters, caregivers often desire to associate all types of measurement and use data from these devices to a specific patient. Thus, patient information entry often occurs at each device. Sometimes, the disparity in devices leads to a need to simply print and store paper from each device in a patient's file for caregiver review. [0005] The result of such device disparity is often a caregiver environment scattered with multiple displays and alarms leading to a potentially chaotic experience. Such chaos can be detrimental to the patient in many situations including surgical environments where caregiver distraction is unwanted, and including recovery or monitoring environments where patient distraction or disturbance may be unwanted. [0006] Various manufacturers produce multi-monitor devices or devices that modularly expand to increase the variety of monitoring or treatment endeavors a particular system can accomplish. However, as medical device technology expands, such multi-monitor devices begin to be obsolete the moment they are installed. SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION [0007] Based on at least the foregoing, a solution is needed that coordinates the various medical devices treating or monitoring a patient. Embodiments of such a solution should provide patient identification seamlessly across the device space and embodiments of such a solution should expand for future technologies without necessarily requiring repeated software upgrades. In addition, embodiments of such a solution may include patient electrical isolation where desired. [0008] Therefore, the present disclosure relates to a patient monitoring hub that is the center of patient monitoring and treatment activities for a given patient. Embodiments of the patient monitoring hub interface with legacy devices without necessitating legacy reprogramming, provide flexibility for interfacing with future devices without necessitating software upgrades, and offer optional patient electrical isolation. In an embodiment, the hub includes a large display dynamically providing information to a caregiver about a wide variety of measurement or otherwise determined parameters. Additionally, in an embodiment, the hub includes a docking station for a portable patient monitor. The portable patient monitor may communicate with the hub through the docking station or through various wireless paradigms known to an artisan from the disclosure herein, including WiFi, Bluetooth, Zigbee, or the like. [0009] In still other embodiments, the portable patient monitor modifies its screen when docked. The undocked display indicia is in part or in whole transferred to a large dynamic display of the hub and the docked display presents one or more anatomical graphics of monitored body parts. For example, the display may present a heart, lungs, a brain, kidneys, intestines, a stomach, other organs, digits, gastrointestinal systems or other body parts when it is docked. In an embodiment, the anatomical graphics may advantageously be animated. In an embodiment, the animation may generally follow the behavior of measured parameters, such as, for example, the lungs may inflate in approximate correlation to the measured respiration rate and/or the determined inspiration portion of a respiration cycle, and likewise deflate according to the expiration portion of the same. The heart may beat according to the pulse rate, may beat generally along understood actual heart contraction patterns, and the like. Moreover, in an embodiment, when the measured parameters indicate a need to alert a caregiver, a changing severity in color may be associated with one or more displayed graphics, such as the heart, lungs, brain, or the like. In still other embodiments, the body portions may include animations on where, when or how to attach measurement devices to measurement sites on the patient. For example, the monitor may provide animated directions for CCHD screening procedures or glucose strip reading protocols, the application of a forehead sensor, a finger or toe sensor, one or more electrodes, an acoustic sensor, and ear sensor, a cannula sensor or the like. [0010] For purposes of summarizing the disclosure, certain aspects, advantages and novel features are discussed herein. It is to be understood that not necessarily all such aspects, advantages or features will be embodied in any particular embodiment of the invention and an artisan would recognize from the disclosure herein a myriad of combinations of such aspects, advantages or features. BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS [0011] The following drawings and the associated descriptions are provided to illustrate embodiments of the present disclosure and do not limit the scope of the claims. [0012] FIGS. 1A-1C illustrate perspective views of an exemplary medical monitoring hub according to an embodiment of the disclosure. For example, FIG. 1A illustrates the hub with an exemplary docked portable patient monitor, FIG. 1B illustrates the hub with a set of medical ports and a noninvasive blood pressure input, and FIG. 1C illustrates the hub with various exemplary temperature sensors attached thereto, all according to various embodiments of the disclosure. [0013] FIG. 2 illustrates a simplified block diagram of an exemplary monitoring environment including the hub of FIG. 1 , according to an embodiment of the disclosure. [0014] FIG. 3 illustrates a simplified exemplary hardware block diagram of the hub of FIG. 1 , according to an embodiment of the disclosure. [0015] FIG. 4 illustrates a perspective view of an exemplary removable docking station of the hub of FIG. 1 , according to an embodiment of the disclosure. [0016] FIG. 5 illustrates a perspective view of exemplary portable patient monitors undocked from the hub of FIG. 1 , according to an embodiment of the disclosure. Moreover, FIG. 5 illustrates an exemplary alternative docking station. [0017] FIG. 6 illustrates a simplified block diagram of traditional patient device electrical isolation principles. [0018] FIG. 7A illustrates a simplified block diagram of an exemplary optional patient device isolation system according to an embodiment of the disclosure, while FIG. 7B adds exemplary optional non-isolation power levels for the system of FIG. 7A , also according to an embodiment of the disclosure. [0019] FIG. 8 illustrates a simplified exemplary universal medical connector configuration process, according to an embodiment of the disclosure. [0020] FIGS. 9A-11K illustrate simplified block diagrams of exemplary universal medical connectors having a size and shape smaller in cross section than tradition isolation requirements. [0021] FIG. 10 illustrates a perspective view of a side of the hub of FIG. 1 , showing exemplary instrument-side channel inputs for exemplary universal medical connectors, according to an embodiment of the disclosure. [0022] FIGS. 11A-11K illustrate various views of exemplary male and mating female universal medical connectors, according to embodiments of the disclosure. [0023] FIG. 12 illustrates a simplified block diagram of a channel system for the hub of FIG. 1 , according to an embodiment of the disclosure. [0024] FIG. 13 illustrates an exemplary logical channel configuration, according to an embodiment of the disclosure. [0025] FIG. 14 illustrates a simplified exemplary process for constructing a cable and configuring a channel according to an embodiment of the disclosure. [0026] FIG. 15 illustrates a perspective view of the hub of FIG. 1 , including an exemplary attached board-in-cable to form an input channel, according to an embodiment of the disclosure. [0027] FIG. 16 illustrates a perspective view of a back side of the hub of FIG. 1 , showing an exemplary instrument-side serial data inputs, according to an embodiment of the disclosure. [0028] FIG. 17A illustrates an exemplary monitoring environment with communication through the serial data connections of FIG. 16 , and FIG. 17B illustrates an exemplary connectivity display of the hub of FIG. 1 , according to embodiments of the disclosure. [0029] FIG. 18 illustrates a simplified exemplary patient data flow process, according to an embodiment of the disclosure. [0030] FIGS. 19A-19J illustrate exemplary displays of anatomical graphics for the portable patient monitor of FIG. 1 docked with the hub of FIG. 1 , according to embodiments of the disclosure. [0031] FIGS. 20A-20C illustrate exemplary displays of measurement data showing data separation and data overlap on a display of the hub of FIG. 1 , respectively, according embodiments of the disclosure. [0032] FIGS. 21A and 21B illustrate exemplary displays of measurement data showing data separation and data overlap on a display of the portable patient monitor of FIG. 1 , respectively, according embodiments of the disclosure. [0033] FIGS. 22A and 22B illustrate exemplary analog display indicia according to an embodiment of the disclosure. [0034] FIGS. 23A-23F illustrate exemplary displays of measurement data showing, for example, data presentation in FIGS. 23A-23D when a depth of consciousness monitor is connected to a channel port of the hub of FIG. 1 , data presentation in FIG. 23E when temperature and blood pressure sensors communicate with the hub of FIG. 1 and data presentation in FIG. 23F when an acoustic sensor is also communicating with the hub of FIG. 1 , according embodiments of the disclosure. [0035] While the foregoing “Brief Description of the Drawings” references generally various embodiments of the disclosure, an artisan will recognize from the disclosure herein that such embodiments are not mutually exclusive. Rather, the artisan would recognize a myriad of combinations of some or all of such embodiments. DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT [0036] The present disclosure relates to a medical monitoring hub configured to be the center of monitoring activity for a given patient. In an embodiment, the hub comprises a large easily readable display, such as an about ten (10) inch display dominating the majority of real estate on a front face of the hub. The display could be much larger or much smaller depending upon design constraints. However, for portability and current design goals, the preferred display is roughly sized proportional to the vertical footprint of one of the dockable portable patient monitors. Other considerations are recognizable from the disclosure herein by those in the art. [0037] The display provides measurement data for a wide variety of monitored parameters for the patient under observation in numerical or graphic form, and in various embodiments, is automatically configured based on the type of data and information being received at the hub. In an embodiment, the hub is moveable, portable, and mountable so that it can be positioned to convenient areas within a caregiver environment. For example, the hub is collected within a singular housing. [0038] In an embodiment, the hub may advantageously receive data from a portable patient monitor while docked or undocked from the hub. Typical portable patient monitors, such as oximeters or co-oximeters can provide measurement data for a large number of physiological parameters derived from signals output from optical and/or acoustic sensors, electrodes, or the like. The physiological parameters include, but not limited to oxygen saturation, carboxy hemoglobin, methemoglobin, total hemoglobin, glucose, pH, bilirubin, fractional saturation, pulse rate, respiration rate, components of a respiration cycle, indications of perfusion including perfusion index, signal quality and/or confidences, plethysmograph data, indications of wellness or wellness indexes or other combinations of measurement data, audio information responsive to respiration, ailment identification or diagnosis, blood pressure, patient and/or measurement site temperature, depth of sedation, organ or brain oxygenation, hydration, measurements responsive to metabolism, combinations of the same or the like, to name a few. In other embodiments, the hub may output data sufficient to accomplish closed-loop drug administration in combination with infusion pumps or the like. [0039] In an embodiment, the hub communicates with other devices in a monitoring environment that are interacting with the patient in a number of ways. For example, the hub advantageously receives serial data from other devices without necessitating their reprogramming or that of the hub. Such other devices include pumps, ventilators, all manner of monitors monitoring any combination of the foregoing parameters, ECG/EEG/EKG devices, electronic patient beds, and the like. Moreover, the hub advantageously receives channel data from other medical devices without necessitating their reprogramming or that of the hub. When a device communicates through channel data, the hub may advantageously alter the large display to include measurement information from that device. Additionally, the hub accesses nurse call systems to ensure that nurse call situations from the device are passed to the appropriate nurse call system. [0040] The hub also communicates with hospital systems to advantageously associate incoming patient measurement and treatment data with the patient being monitored. For example, the hub may communicate wirelessly or otherwise to a multi-patient monitoring system, such as a server or collection of servers, which in turn many communicate with a caregiver's data management systems, such as, for example, an Admit, Discharge, Transfer (“ADT”) system and/or an Electronic Medical Records (“EMR”) system. The hub advantageously associates the data flowing through it with the patient being monitored thereby providing the electronic measurement and treatment information to be passed to the caregiver's data management systems without the caregiver associating each device in the environment with the patient. [0041] In an embodiment, the hub advantageously includes a reconfigurable and removable docking station. The docking station may dock additional layered docking stations to adapt to different patient monitoring devices. Additionally, the docking station itself is modularized so that it may be removed if the primary dockable portable patient monitor changes its form factor. Thus, the hub is flexible in how its docking station is configured. [0042] In an embodiment, the hub includes a large memory for storing some or all of the data it receives, processes, and/or associates with the patient, and/or communications it has with other devices and systems. Some or all of the memory may advantageously comprise removable SD memory. [0043] The hub communicates with other devices through at least (1) the docking station to acquire data from a portable monitor, (2) innovative universal medical connectors to acquire channel data, (3) serial data connectors, such as RJ ports to acquire output data, (4) Ethernet, USB, and nurse call ports, (5) Wireless devices to acquire data from a portable monitor, (6) other wired or wireless communication mechanisms known to an artisan. The universal medical connectors advantageously provide optional electrically isolated power and communications, are designed to be smaller in cross section than isolation requirements. The connectors and the hub communicate to advantageously translate or configure data from other devices to be usable and displayable for the hub. In an embodiment, a software developers kit (“SDK”) is provided to a device manufacturer to establish or define the behavior and meaning of the data output from their device. When the output is defined, the definition is programmed into a memory residing in the cable side of the universal medical connector and supplied as an original equipment manufacture (“OEM”) to the device provider. When the cable is connected between the device and the hub, the hub understands the data and can use it for display and processing purposes without necessitating software upgrades to the device or the hub. In an embodiment, the hub can negotiate the schema and even add additional compression and/or encryption. Through the use of the universal medical connectors, the hub organizes the measurement and treatment data into a single display and alarm system effectively and efficiently bringing order to the monitoring environment. [0044] As the hub receives and tracks data from other devices according to a channel paradigm, the hub may advantageously provide processing to create virtual channels of patient measurement or treatment data. In an embodiment, a virtual channel may comprise a non-measured parameter that is, for example, the result of processing data from various measured or other parameters. An example of such a parameter includes a wellness indicator derived from various measured parameters that give an overall indication of the wellbeing of the monitored patient. An example of a wellness parameter is disclosed in U.S. patent application Ser. Nos. 13/269,296, 13/371,767 and 12/904,925, by the assignee of the present disclosure and incorporated by reference herein. By organizing data into channels and virtual channels, the hub may advantageously time-wise synchronize incoming data and virtual channel data. [0045] The hub also receives serial data through serial communication ports, such as RJ connectors. The serial data is associated with the monitored patient and passed on to the multi-patient server systems and/or caregiver backend systems discussed above. Through receiving the serial data, the caregiver advantageously associates devices in the caregiver environment, often from varied manufactures, with a particular patient, avoiding a need to have each individual device associated with the patient and possible communicating with hospital systems. Such association is vital as it reduces caregiver time spent entering biographic and demographic information into each device about the patient. Moreover, in an embodiment, through the SDK the device manufacturer may advantageously provide information associated with any measurement delay of their device, thereby further allowing the hub to advantageously time-wise synchronize serial incoming data and other data associated with the patient. [0046] In an embodiment, when a portable patient monitor is docked, and it includes its own display, the hub effectively increases its display real estate. For example, in an embodiment, the portable patient monitor may simply continue to display its measurement and/or treatment data, which may be now duplicated on the hub display, or the docked display may alter its display to provide additional information. In an embodiment, the docked display, when docked, presents anatomical graphical data of, for example, the heart, lungs, organs, the brain, or other body parts being measured and/or treated. The graphical data may advantageously animate similar to and in concert with the measurement data. For example, lungs may inflate in approximate correlation to the measured respiration rate and/or the determined inspiration/expiration portions of a respiration cycle, the heart may beat according to the pulse rate, may beat generally along understood actual heart contraction patterns, the brain may change color or activity based on varying depths of sedation, or the like. In an embodiment, when the measured parameters indicate a need to alert a caregiver, a changing severity in color may be associated with one or more displayed graphics, such as the heart, lungs, brain, organs, circulatory system or portions thereof, respiratory system or portions thereof, other body parts or the like. In still other embodiments, the body portions may include animations on where, when or how to attach measurement devices. [0047] The hub may also advantageously overlap parameter displays to provide additional visual information to the caregiver. Such overlapping may be user definable and configurable. The display may also incorporate analog-appearing icons or graphical indicia. [0048] In the interest of clarity, not all features of an actual implementation are described in this specification. An artisan will of course be appreciate that in the development of any such actual implementation (as in any development project), numerous implementation-specific decisions must be made to achieve a developers' specific goals and subgoals, such as compliance with system- and business-related constraints, which will vary from one implementation to another. Moreover, it will be appreciated that such a development effort might be complex and time-consuming, but would nevertheless be a routine undertaking of device engineering for those of ordinary skill having the benefit of this disclosure. [0049] To facilitate a complete understanding of the disclosure, the remainder of the detailed description describes the disclosure with reference to the drawings, wherein like reference numbers are referenced with like numerals throughout. [0050] FIG. 1A illustrates a perspective view of an exemplary medical monitoring hub 100 with an exemplary docked portable patient monitor 102 according to an embodiment of the disclosure. The hub 100 includes a display 104 , and a docking station 106 , which in an embodiment is configured to mechanically and electrically mate with the portable patient monitor 102 , each housed in a movable, mountable and portable housing 108 . The housing 108 includes a generally upright inclined shape configured to rest on a horizontal flat surface, although the housing 108 can be affixed in a wide variety of positions and mountings and comprise a wide variety of shapes and sizes. [0051] In an embodiment, the display 104 may present a wide variety of measurement and/or treatment data in numerical, graphical, waveform, or other display indicia 110 . In an embodiment, the display 104 occupies much of a front face of the housing 108 , although an artisan will appreciate the display 104 may comprise a tablet or tabletop horizontal configuration, a laptop-like configuration or the like. Other embodiments may include communicating display information and data to a table computer, smartphone, television, or any display system recognizable to an artisan. The upright inclined configuration of FIG. 1A presents display information to a caregiver in an easily viewable manner. [0052] FIG. 1B shows a perspective side view of an embodiment of the hub 100 including the housing 108 , the display 104 , and the docking station 106 without a portable monitor docked. Also shown is a connector for noninvasive blood pressure. [0053] In an embodiment, the housing 108 may also include pockets or indentations to hold additional medical devices, such as, for example, a blood pressure monitor or temperature sensor 112 , such as that shown in FIG. 1C . [0054] The portable patient monitor 102 of FIG. 1A may advantageously comprise an oximeter, co-oximeter, respiratory monitor, depth of sedation monitor, noninvasive blood pressure monitor, vital signs monitor or the like, such as those commercially available from Masimo Corporation of Irvine, Calif., and/or disclosed in U.S. Pat. Pub. Nos. 2002/0140675, 2010/0274099, 2011/0213273, 2012/0226117, 2010/0030040; U.S. Patent Application Ser. Nos. 61/242,792, 61/387457, 61/645,570, 13/554,908 and U.S. Pat. Nos. 6,157,850, 6,334,065, and the like. The monitor 102 may communicate with a variety of noninvasive and/or minimally invasive devices such as optical sensors with light emission and detection circuitry, acoustic sensors, devices that measure blood parameters from a finger prick, cuffs, ventilators, and the like. The monitor 102 may include its own display 114 presenting its own display indicia 116 , discussed below with reference to FIGS. 19A-19J . The display indicia may advantageously change based on a docking state of the monitor 102 . When undocked, the display indicia may include parameter information and may alter orientation based on, for example, a gravity sensor or accelerometer. [0055] In an embodiment, the docking station 106 of the hub 100 includes a mechanical latch 118 , or mechanically releasable catch to ensure that movement of the hub 100 doesn't mechanically detach the monitor 102 in a manner that could damage the same. [0056] Although disclosed with reference to particular portable patient monitors 102 , an artisan will recognize from the disclosure herein a large number and wide variety of medical devices that may advantageously dock with the hub 100 . Moreover, the docking station 106 may advantageously electrically and not mechanically connect with the monitor 102 , and/or wirelessly communicate with the same. [0057] FIG. 2 illustrates a simplified block diagram of an exemplary monitoring environment 200 including the hub 100 of FIG. 1 , according to an embodiment of the disclosure. As shown in FIG. 2 , the environment may include the portable patient monitor 102 communicating with one or more patient sensors 202 , such as, for example, oximetry optical sensors, acoustic sensors, blood pressure sensors, respiration sensors or the like. In an embodiment, additional sensors, such as, for example, a NIBP sensor or system 211 and a temperature sensor or sensor system 213 may communicate directly with the hub 100 . The sensors 202 , 211 and 213 when in use are typically in proximity to the patient being monitored if not actually attached to the patient at a measurement site. [0058] As disclosed, the portable patient monitor 102 communicates with the hub 100 , in an embodiment, through the docking station 106 when docked and, in an embodiment, wirelessly when undocked, however, such undocked communication is not required. The hub 100 communicates with one or more multi-patient monitoring servers 204 or server systems, such as, for example, those disclosed with in U.S. Pat. Pub. Nos. 2011/0105854, 2011/0169644, and 2007/0180140. In general, the server 204 communicates with caregiver backend systems 206 such as EMR and/or ADT systems. The server 204 may advantageously obtain through push, pull or combination technologies patient information entered at patient admission, such as demographical information, billing information, and the like. The hub 100 accesses this information to seamlessly associate the monitored patient with the caregiver backend systems 206 . Communication between the server 204 and the monitoring hub 100 may be any recognizable to an artisan from the disclosure herein, including wireless, wired, over mobile or other computing networks, or the like. [0059] FIG. 2 also shows the hub 100 communicating through its serial data ports 210 and channel data ports 212 . As disclosed in the forgoing, the serial data ports 210 may provide data from a wide variety of patient medical devices, including electronic patient bed systems 214 , infusion pump systems 216 including closed loop control systems, ventilator systems 218 , blood pressure or other vital sign measurement systems 220 , or the like. Similarly, the channel data ports 212 may provide data from a wide variety of patient medical devices, including any of the foregoing, and other medical devices. For example, the channel data ports 212 may receive data from depth of consciousness monitors 222 , such as those commercially available from SEDLine, brain or other organ oximeter devices 224 , noninvasive blood pressure or acoustic devices 226 , or the like. In an embodiment, channel device may include board-in-cable (“BIC”) solutions where the processing algorithms and the signal processing devices that accomplish those algorithms are mounted to a board housed in a cable or cable connector, which in some embodiments has no additional display technologies. The BIC solution outputs its measured parameter data to the channel port 212 to be displayed on the display 104 of hub 100 . In an embodiment, the hub 100 may advantageously be entirely or partially formed as a BIC solution that communicates with other systems, such as, for example, tablets, smartphones, or other computing systems. [0060] Although disclosed with reference to a single docking station 106 , the environment 200 may include stacked docking stations where a subsequent docking station mechanically and electrically docks to a first docking station to change the form factor for a different portable patent monitor as discussed with reference to FIG. 5 . Such stacking may include more than 2 docking stations, may reduce or increase the form fact for mechanical compliance with mating mechanical structures on a portable device. [0061] FIG. 3 illustrates a simplified exemplary hardware block diagram of the hub 100 of FIG. 1 , according to an embodiment of the disclosure. As shown in FIG. 3 , the housing 108 of the hub 100 positions and/or encompasses an instrument board 302 , the display 104 , memory 304 , and the various communication connections, including the serial ports 210 , the channel ports 212 , Ethernet ports 305 , nurse call port 306 , other communication ports 308 including standard USB or the like, and the docking station interface 310 . The instrument board 302 comprises one or more substrates including communication interconnects, wiring, ports and the like to enable the communications and functions described herein, including inter-board communications. A core board 312 includes the main parameter, signal, and other processor(s) and memory, a portable monitor board (“RIB”) 314 includes patient electrical isolation for the monitor 102 and one or more processors, a channel board (“MID”) 316 controls the communication with the channel ports 212 including optional patient electrical isolation and power supply 318 , and a radio board 320 includes components configured for wireless communications. Additionally, the instrument board 302 may advantageously include one or more processors and controllers, busses, all manner of communication connectivity and electronics, memory, memory readers including EPROM readers, and other electronics recognizable to an artisan from the disclosure herein. Each board comprises substrates for positioning and support, interconnect for communications, electronic components including controllers, logic devices, hardware/software combinations and the like to accomplish the tasks designated above and others. [0062] An artisan will recognize from the disclosure herein that the instrument board 302 may comprise a large number of electronic components organized in a large number of ways. Using different boards such as those disclosed above advantageously provides organization and compartmentalization to the complex system. [0063] FIG. 4 illustrates a perspective view of an exemplary removable docking station 400 of the hub 100 of FIG. 1 , according to an embodiment of the disclosure. As shown in FIG. 4 , the docking station 400 provides a mechanical mating to portable patient monitor 102 to provide secure mechanical support when the monitor 102 is docked. The docking station 400 includes a cavity 402 shaped similar to the periphery of a housing of the portable monitor 102 . The station 400 also includes one or more electrical connectors 404 providing communication to the hub 100 . Although shown as mounted with bolts, the docking station 400 may snap fit, may use movable tabs or catches, may magnetically attach, or may employ a wide variety or combination of attachment mechanisms know to an artisan from the disclosure herein. In an embodiment, the attachment of the docking station 400 should be sufficiently secure that when docked, the monitor 102 and docking station cannot be accidentally detached in a manner that could damage the instruments, such as, for example, if the hub 100 was accidently bumped or the like, the monitor 102 and docking station 400 should remain intact. [0064] The housing 108 of the hub 100 also includes cavity 406 housing the docking station 400 . To the extent a change to the form factor for the portable patient monitor 102 occurs, the docking station 400 is advantageously removable and replaceable. Similar to the docking station 400 , the hub 100 includes within the cavity 406 of the housing 108 electrical connectors 408 providing electrical communication to the docking station 400 . In an embodiment, the docking station 400 includes its own microcontroller and processing capabilities, such as those disclosed in U.S. Pat. Pub. No. 2002/0140675. In other embodiments, the docking station 400 passes communications through to the electrical connector 408 . [0065] FIG. 4 also shows the housing 108 including openings for channel ports 212 as universal medical connectors discussed in detail below. [0066] FIG. 5 illustrates a perspective view of exemplary portable patient monitors 502 and 504 undocked from the hub 100 of FIG. 1 , according to an embodiment of the disclosure. As shown in FIG. 5 , the monitor 502 may be removed and other monitors, like monitor 504 may be provided. The docking station 106 includes an additional docking station 506 that mechanically mates with the original docking station 106 and presents a form factor mechanically matable with monitor 504 . In an embodiment, the monitor 504 mechanically and electrically mates with the stacked docking stations 506 and 106 of hub 100 . As can be readily appreciated by and artisan from the disclosure herein, the stackable function of the docking stations provides the hub 100 with an extremely flexible mechanism for charging, communicating, and interfacing with a wide variety of patient monitoring devices. As noted above, the docking stations may be stacked, or in other embodiments, removed and replaced. [0067] FIG. 6 illustrates a simplified block diagram of traditional patient electrical isolation principles. As shown in FIG. 6 , a host device 602 is generally associated with a patient device 604 through communication and power. As the patient device 604 often comprises electronics proximate or connected to a patient, such as sensors or the like, certain safety requirements dictate that electrical surges of energy from, for example, the power grid connected to the host device, should not find an electrical path to the patient. This is generally referred to a “patient isolation” which is a term known in the art and includes herein the removing of direct uninterrupted electrical paths between the host device 602 and the patient device 604 . Such isolation is accomplished through, for example, isolation devices 606 on power conductors 608 and communication conductors 610 . Isolation devices 606 can include transformers, optical devices that emit and detect optical energy, and the like. Use of isolation devices, especially on power conductors, can be expensive component wise, expensive size wise, and drain power. Traditionally, the isolation devices were incorporated into the patient device 604 , however, the patient devices 604 are trending smaller and smaller and not all devices incorporate isolation. [0068] FIG. 7A illustrates a simplified block diagram of an exemplary optional patient isolation system according to an embodiment of the disclosure. As shown in FIG. 7A , the host device 602 communicates with an isolated patient device 604 through isolation devices 606 . However, a memory 702 associated with a particular patient device informs the host 602 whether that device needs isolated power. If a patient device 708 does not need isolated power, such as some types of cuffs, infusion pumps, ventilators, or the like, then the host 602 can provide non-isolated power through signal path 710 . This power may be much higher that what can cost-effectively be provided through the isolated power conductor 608 . In an embodiment, the non-isolated patient devices 708 receive isolated communication as such communication is typically at lower voltages and is not cost prohibitive. An artisan will recognize from the disclosure herein that communication could also be non-isolated. Thus, FIG. 7A shows a patient isolation system 700 that provides optional patient isolation between a host 602 and a wide variety of potential patient devices 604 , 708 . In an embodiment, the hub 100 includes the channel ports 212 incorporating similar optional patient isolation principles. [0069] FIG. 7B adds an exemplary optional non-isolation power levels for the system of FIG. 7A according to an embodiment of the disclosure. As shown in FIG. 7B , once the host 602 understands that the patient device 604 comprises a self-isolated patient device 708 , and thus does not need isolated power, the host 602 provides power through a separate conductor 710 . Because the power is not isolated, the memory 702 may also provide power requirements to the host 602 , which may select from two or more voltage or power levels. In FIG. 7B , the host 602 provides either high power, such as about 12 volts, but could have a wide range of voltages or very high power such as about 24 volts or more, but could have a wide range of voltages, to the patient device 708 . An artisan will recognize that supply voltages can advantageously be altered to meet the specific needs of virtually any device 708 and/or the memory could supply information to the host 602 which provided a wide range of non-isolated power to the patient device 708 . [0070] Moreover, using the memory 702 , the host 602 may determine to simply not enable any unused power supplies, whether that be the isolated power or one or more of the higher voltage non-isolated power supplies, thereby increasing the efficiency of the host. [0071] FIG. 8 illustrates a simplified exemplary universal medical connector configuration process 800 , according to an embodiment of the disclosure. As shown in FIG. 8 , the process includes step 802 , where a cable is attached to a universal medical connector incorporating optional patient isolation as disclosed in the foregoing. In step 804 , the host device 602 or the hub 100 , more specifically, the channel data board 316 or EPROM reader of the instrument board, reads the data stored in the memory 702 and in step 806 , determines whether the connecting device requires isolated power. In step 808 , when the isolated power is required, the hub 100 may advantageously enable isolated power and in step 810 , enable isolated communications. In step 806 , when isolated power is not needed, the hub 100 may simply in optional step 812 enable non-isolated power and in embodiments where communications remain isolated, step 810 enable isolated communications. In other optional embodiments, in step 806 , when isolated power is not needed, the hub 100 in step 814 may use information from memory 702 to determine the amount of power needed for the patient device 708 . When sufficient power is not available, because for example, other connected devices are also using connected power, in step 816 a message may be displayed indicating the same and power is not provided. When sufficient power is available, optional step 812 may enable non-isolated power. Alternatively, optional step 818 may determine whether memory 702 indicates higher or lower power is desired. When higher power is desired, the hub 100 may enable higher power in step 820 and when not, may enable lower power in step 822 . The hub 100 in step 810 then enables isolated communication. In an embodiment, the hub 100 in step 818 may simply determine how much power is needed and provide at least sufficient power to the self-isolated device 708 . [0072] An artisan will recognize from the disclosure herein that hub 100 may not check to see if sufficient power is available or may provide one, two or many levels of non-isolated voltages based on information from the memory 702 . [0073] FIGS. 9A and 9B illustrate simplified block diagrams of exemplary universal medical connectors 900 having a size and shape smaller in cross section than tradition isolation requirements. In an embodiment, the connector 900 physically separates non-isolated signals on one side 910 from isolated signals on another side 920 , although the sides could be reversed. The gap between such separations may be dictated at least in part by safety regulations governing patient isolation. In an embodiment, the distance between the sides 910 and 920 may appear to be too small. [0074] As shown from a different perspective in FIG. 9B , the distance between connectors “x” appears small. However, the gap causes the distance to includes a non-direct path between conductors. For example, any short would have to travel path 904 , and the distance of such path is within or beyond such safety regulations, in that the distance is greater than “x.” It is noteworthy that the non-straight line path 904 occurs throughout the connector, such as, for example, on the board connector side where solder connects various pins to a PCB board. [0075] FIG. 10 illustrates a perspective view of a side of the hub 100 of FIG. 1 , showing exemplary instrument-side channel inputs 1000 as exemplary universal medical connectors. As shown in FIG. 10 , the inputs include the non-isolated side 910 , the isolated side 920 , and the gap. In an embodiment, the memory 710 communicates through pins on the non-isolated side. [0076] FIGS. 11A-11K illustrate various views of exemplary male and mating female universal medical connectors, according to embodiments of the disclosure. For example, FIGS. 11 G 1 and 11 G 2 shows various preferred but not required sizing, and FIG. 11H shows incorporation of electronic components, such as the memory 702 into the connectors. FIGS. 11I-11K illustrate wiring diagrams and cabling specifics of the cable itself as it connects to the universal medical connectors. [0077] FIG. 12 illustrates a simplified block diagram of a channel system for the hub of FIG. 1 , according to an embodiment of the disclosure. As shown in FIG. 12 , a male cable connector, such as those shown in FIG. 11 above, includes a memory such as an EPROM. The memory advantageously stores information describing the type of data the hub 100 can expect to receive, and how to receive the same. A controller of the hub 100 communicates with the EPROM to negotiate how to receive the data, and if possible, how to display the data on display 104 , alarm when needed, and the like. For example, a medical device supplier may contact the hub provider and receive a software developers' kit (“SDK”) that guides the supplier through how to describe the type of data output from their device. After working with the SDK, a map, image, or other translation file may advantageously be loaded into the EPROM, as well as the power requirements and isolation requirements discussed above. When the channel cable is connected to the hub 100 through the channel port 212 , the hub 100 reads the EPROM and the controller of the hub 100 negotiates how to handle incoming data. [0078] FIG. 13 illustrates an exemplary logical channel configuration that may be stored in the EPROM of FIG. 12 . As shown in FIG. 13 , each incoming channel describes one or more parameters. Each parameter describes whatever the hub 100 should know about the incoming data. For example, the hub 100 may want to know whether the data is streaming data, waveform data, already determined parameter measurement data, ranges on the data, speed of data delivery, units of the data, steps of the units, colors for display, alarm parameters and thresholds, including complex algorithms for alarm computations, other events that are parameter value driven, combinations of the same or the like. Additionally, the parameter information may include device delay times to assist in data synchronization or approximations of data synchronization across parameters or other data received by the hub 100 . In an embodiment, the SDK presents a schema to the device supplier which self-describes the type and order of incoming data. In an embodiment, the information advantageously negotiates with the hub 100 to determine whether to apply compression and/or encryption to the incoming data stream. [0079] Such open architecture advantageously provides device manufacturers the ability to port the output of their device into the hub 100 for display, processing, and data management as disclosed in the foregoing. By implementation through the cable connector, the device manufacturer avoids any reprogramming of their original device; rather, they simply let the hub 100 know through the cable connector how the already existing output is formatted. Moreover, by describing the data in a language already understood by the hub 100 , the hub 100 also avoids software upgrades to accommodate data from “new-to-the-hub” medical devices. [0080] FIG. 14 illustrates a simplified exemplary process for configuring a channel according to an embodiment of the disclosure. As shown in FIG. 14 , the hub provider provides a device manufacturer with an SDK in step 1402 , who in turn uses the SDK to self-describe the output data channel from their device in step 1404 . In an embodiment, the SDK is a series of questions that guide the development, in other embodiments, the SDK provides a language and schema to describe the behavior of the data. [0081] Once the device provider describes the data, the hub provider creates a binary image or other file to store in a memory within a cable connector in step 1405 ; however, the SDK may create the image and simply communicated it to the hub provider. The cable connector is provided as an OEM part to the provider in step 1410 , who constructs and manufactures the cable to mechanically and electrically mate with output ports on their devices in step 1412 . [0082] Once a caregiver has the appropriately manufactured cable, with one end matching the device provider's system and the other OEM'ed to match the hub 100 at its channel ports 212 , in step 1452 the caregiver can connect the hub between the devices. In step 1454 , the hub 100 reads the memory, provides isolated or non-isolated power, and the cable controller and the hub 100 negotiate a protocol or schema for data delivery. In an embodiment, a controller on the cable may negotiated the protocol, in an alternative embodiment, the controller of the hub 100 negotiates with other processors on the hub the particular protocol. Once the protocol is set, the hub 100 can use, display and otherwise process the incoming data stream in an intelligent manner. [0083] Through the use of the universal medical connectors described herein, connection of a myriad of devices to the hub 100 is accomplished through straightforward programming of a cable connector as opposed to necessitating software upgrades to each device. [0084] FIG. 15 illustrates a perspective view of the hub of FIG. 1 including an exemplary attached board-in-cable (“BIC”) to form an input channel according to an embodiment of the disclosure. As shown in FIG. 15 , a SEDLine depth of consciousness board communicates data from an appropriate patient sensor to the hub 100 for display and caregiver review. As described, the provider of the board need only use the SDK to describe their data channel, and the hub 100 understands how to present the data to the caregiver. [0085] FIG. 16 illustrates a perspective view of a back side of the hub 100 of FIG. 1 , showing an exemplary serial data inputs. In an embodiment, the inputs include such as RJ 45 ports. As is understood in the art, these ports include a data ports similar to those found on computers, network routers, switches and hubs. In an embodiment, a plurality of these ports are used to associate data from various devices with the specific patient identified in the hub 100 . FIG. 16 also shows a speaker, the nurse call connector, the Ethernet connector, the USBs, a power connector and a medical grounding lug. [0086] FIG. 17A illustrates an exemplary monitoring environment with communication through the serial data connections of the hub 100 of FIG. 1 , according to an embodiment of the disclosure. As shown and as discussed in the foregoing, the hub 100 may use the serial data ports 210 to gather data from various devices within the monitoring environment, including an electronic bed, infusion pumps, ventilators, vital sign monitors, and the like. The difference between the data received from these devices and that received through the channel ports 212 is that the hub 100 may not know the format or structure of this data. The hub 100 may not display information from this data or use this data in calculations or processing. However, porting the data through the hub 100 conveniently associates the data with the specifically monitored patient in the entire chain of caregiver systems, including the foregoing server 214 and backend systems 206 . In an embodiment, the hub 100 may determine sufficient information about the incoming data to attempt to synchronize it with data from the hub 100 . [0087] In FIG. 17B , a control screen may provide information on the type of data being received. In an embodiment, a green light next to the data indicates connection to a device and on which serial input the connection occurs. [0088] FIG. 18 illustrates a simplified exemplary patient data flow process, according to an embodiment of the disclosure. As shown, once a patient is admitted into the caregiver environment at step 1802 , data about the patient is populated on the caregiver backend systems 206 . The server 214 may advantageously acquire or receive this information in step 1804 , and then make it accessible to the hub 100 . When the caregiver at step 1806 assigns the hub 100 to the patient, the caregiver simply looks at the presently available patient data and selects the particular patient being currently monitored. The hub 100 at step 1808 then associates the measurement, monitoring and treatment data it receives and determines with that patient. The caregiver need not again associate another device with the patient so long as that device is communicating through the hub 100 by way of (1) the docking station, (2) the universal medical connectors, (3) the serial data connectors, or (4) other communication mechanisms known to an artisan. At step 1810 , some or the entirety of the received, processed and/or determined data is passed to the server systems discussed above. [0089] FIGS. 19A-19J illustrate exemplary displays of anatomical graphics for the portable patient monitor docked with the hub 100 of FIG. 1 , according to embodiments of the disclosure. As shown in FIG. 19A , the heart, lungs and respiratory system are shown while the brain is not highlighted. Thus, a caregiver can readily determine that depth of consciousness monitoring or brain oximetry systems are not currently communicating with the hub 100 through the portable patient monitor connection or the channel data ports. However, it is likely that acoustic or other respiratory data and cardiac data is being communicated to or measured by the hub 100 . Moreover, the caregiver can readily determine that the hub 100 is not receiving alarming data with respect to the emphasized body portions. In an embodiment, the emphasized portion may animate to show currently measured behavior or, alternatively, animate in a predetermined fashion. [0090] FIG. 19B shows the addition of a virtual channel showing an indication of wellness. As shown in FIG. 19B , the indication is positive as it is a “34” on an increasingly severity scale to “100.” The wellness indication may also be shaded to show problems. In contrast to FIG. 19B , FIG. 19C shows a wellness number that is becoming or has become problematic and an alarming heart graphic. Thus, a caregiver responding to a patient alarm on the hub 100 or otherwise on another device or system monitoring or treating the patient can quickly determine that a review of vital signs and other parameters relating to heart function is needed to diagnose and/or treat the patient. [0091] FIGS. 19D and 19E show the brain included in the emphasized body portions meaning that the hub 100 is receiving data relevant to brain functions, such as, for example, depth of sedation data or brain oximetry data. FIG. 19E additionally shows an alarming heart function similar to FIG. 19C . [0092] In FIG. 19F , additional organs, such as the kidneys are being monitored, but the respiratory system is not. In FIG. 19G , an alarming hear function is shown, and in FIG. 19H , an alarming circulatory system is being shown. FIG. 191 shows the wellness indication along with lungs, heart, brain and kidneys. FIG. 19J shows alarming lungs, heart, and circulatory system as well as the wellness indication. Moreover, FIG. 19J shows a severity contrast, such as, for example, the heart alarming red for urgent while the circulatory system alarms yellow for caution. An artisan will recognize other color schemes that are appropriate from the disclosure herein. [0093] FIGS. 20A-20C illustrate exemplary displays of measurement data showing data separation and data overlap, respectively, according embodiments of the disclosure. FIGS. 21A and 21B illustrate exemplary displays of measurement data also showing data separation and data overlap, respectively, according embodiments of the disclosure. [0094] For example, acoustic data from an acoustic sensor may advantageously provide breath sound data, while the plethysmograph and ECG or other signals can also be presented in separate waveforms ( FIG. 20A , top of the screen capture). The monitor may determine any of a variety of respiratory parameters of a patient, including respiratory rate, expiratory flow, tidal volume, minute volume, apnea duration, breath sounds, riles, rhonchi, stridor, and changes in breath sounds such as decreased volume or change in airflow. In addition, in some cases a system monitors other physiological sounds, such as heart rate to help with probe off detection, heart sounds (S 1 , S 2 , S 3 , S 4 , and murmurs), and change in heart sounds such as normal to murmur or split heart sounds indicating fluid overload. [0095] Providing a visual correlation between multiple physiological signals can provide a number of valuable benefits where the signals have some observable physiological correlation. As one example of such a correlation, changes in morphology (e.g., envelope and/or baseline) of the plethysmographic signal can be indicative of patient blood or other fluid levels. And, these changes can be monitored to detect hypovolemia or other fluid-level related conditions. A pleth variability index may provide an indication of fluid levels, for example. And, changes in the morphology of the plethysmographic signal are correlated to respiration. For example, changes in the envelope and/or baseline of the plethysmographic signal are correlated to breathing. This is at least in part due to aspects of the human anatomical structure, such as the mechanical relationship and interaction between the heart and the lungs during respiration. [0096] Thus, superimposing a plethysmographic signal and a respiratory signal ( FIG. 20B ) can give operators an indication of the validity of the plethysmographic signal or signals derived therefrom, such as a pleth variability index. For example, if bursts in the respiration signal indicative of inhalation and exhalation correlate with changes in peaks and valleys of the plethysmographic envelope, this gives monitoring personnel a visual indication that the plethysmographic changes are indeed due to respiration, and not some other extraneous factor. Similarly, if the bursts in the respiration signal line up with the peaks and valleys in the plethysmographic envelope, this provides monitoring personnel an indication that the bursts in the respiration signal are due to patient breathing sounds, and not some other non-targeted sounds (e.g., patient non-breathing sounds or non-patient sounds). [0097] The monitor may also be configured to process the signals and determine whether there is a threshold level of correlation between the two signals, or otherwise assess the correlation. However, by additionally providing a visual indication of the correlation, such as by showing the signals superimposed with one another, the display provides operators a continuous, intuitive and readily observable gauge of the particular physiological correlation. For example, by viewing the superimposed signals, users can observe trends in the correlation over time, which may not be otherwise ascertainable. [0098] The monitor can visually correlate a variety of other types of signals instead of, or in addition to plethysmographic and respiratory signals. For example, FIG. 20C depicts a screen shot of another example monitoring display. As shown in the upper right portion of FIG. 20C , the display superimposes a plethysmographic signal, an ECG signal, and a respiration signal. In other configurations, more than three different types of signals may be overlaid onto one another. [0099] In one embodiment, the hub 100 nothing provides an interface through which the user can move the signals together to overlay on one another. For example, the user may be able to drag the respiration signal down onto the plethysmographic signal using a touch screen interface. Conversely, the user may be able to separate the signals, also using the touch screen interface. In another embodiment, the monitor includes a button the user can press, or some other user interface allowing the user to overlay and separate the signals, as desired. FIGS. 21A and 21B show similar separation and joining of the signals. [0100] In certain configurations, in addition to providing the visual correlation between the plethysmographic signal and the respiratory signal, the monitor is additionally configured to process the respiratory signal and the plethysmographic signal to determine a correlation between the two signals. For example, the monitor may process the signals to determine whether the peaks and valleys in the changes in the envelope and/or baseline of the plethysmographic signal correspond to bursts in the respiratory signal. And, in response to the determining that there is or is not a threshold level of correlation, the monitor may provide some indication to the user. For example, the monitor may provide a graphical indication (e.g., a change in color of pleth variability index indicator), an audible alarm, or some other indication. The monitor may employ one or more envelope detectors or other appropriate signal processing componentry in making the determination. [0101] In certain embodiments, the system may further provide an audible indication of the patient's breathing sounds instead of, or in addition to the graphical indication. For example, the monitor may include a speaker, or an earpiece (e.g., a wireless earpiece) may be provided to the monitoring personnel providing an audible output of the patient sounds. Examples of sensors and monitors having such capability are described in U.S. Pat. Pub. No. 2011/0172561 and are incorporated by reference herein. [0102] In addition to the above described benefits, providing both the acoustic and plethysmographic signals on the same display in the manner described can allow monitoring personnel to more readily detect respiratory pause events where there is an absence of breathing, high ambient noise that can degrade the acoustic signal, improper sensor placement, etc. [0103] FIGS. 22A-22B illustrate exemplary analog display indicia, according to an embodiment of the disclosure. As shown in FIGS. 22A and 22B , the screen shots displays health indicators of various physiological parameters, in addition to other data. Each health indicator can include an analog indicator and/or a digital indicator. In embodiments where the health indicator includes an analog and a digital indicator, the analog and digital indicators can be positioned in any number of formations, such as side-by-side, above, below, transposed, etc. In the illustrated embodiment, the analog indicators are positioned above and to the sides of the digital indicators. As shown more clearly in FIG. 22B , the analog displays may include colored warning sections, dashes indicating position on the graph, and digital information designating quantitate information form the graph. In FIG. 22B , for example, the pulse rate PR graph shows that from about 50 to about 140 beats per minute, the graph is either neutral or beginning to be cautionary, whereas outside those numbers the graph is colored to indicate a severe condition. Thus, as the dash moves along the arc, a caregiver can readily see where in the range of acceptable, cautionary, and extreme the current measurements fall. [0104] Each analog indicator of the health indicator can include a dial that moves about an arc based on measured levels of monitored physiological parameters. As the measured physiological parameter levels increase the dial can move clockwise, and as the measured physiological parameter levels decrease, the dial can move counter-clockwise, or vice versa. In this way, a user can quickly determine the patient's status by looking at the analog indicator. For example, if the dial is in the center of the arc, the observer can be assured that the current physiological parameter measurements are normal, and if the dial is skewed too far to the left or right, the observer can quickly assess the severity of the physiological parameter levels and take appropriate action. In other embodiments, normal parameter measurements can be indicated when the dial is to the right or left, etc. [0105] In some embodiments, the dial can be implemented as a dot, dash, arrow, or the like, and the arc can be implemented as a circle, spiral, pyramid, or other shape, as desired. Furthermore, the entire arc can be lit up or only portions of the arc can be lit up based on the current physiological parameter measurement level. Furthermore, the arc can turn colors or be highlighted based on the current physiological parameter level. For example, as the dial approaches a threshold level, the arc and/or dial can turn from green, to yellow, to red, shine brighter, flash, be enlarged, move to the center of the display, or the like. [0106] Different physiological parameters can have different thresholds indicating abnormal conditions. For example, some physiological parameters may upper a lower threshold levels, while others only have an upper threshold or a lower threshold. Accordingly, each health indicator can be adjusted based on the physiological parameter being monitored. For example, the SpO2 health indicator can have a lower threshold that when met activates an alarm, while the respiration rate health indicator can have both a lower and upper threshold, and when either is met an alarm is activated. The thresholds for each physiological parameter can be based on typical, expected thresholds and/or user-specified thresholds. [0107] The digital indicator can provide a numerical representation of the current levels of the physiological parameter the digital indicator may indicate an actual level or a normalized level and can also be used to quickly assess the severity of a patient condition. In some embodiments, the display includes multiple health indicators for each monitored physiological parameter. In certain embodiments, the display includes fewer health indicators than the number of monitored physiological parameters. In such embodiments, the health indicators can cycle between different monitored physiological parameters. [0108] FIGS. 23A-23F illustrate exemplary displays of measurement data showing, for example, data presentation in FIGS. 23A-23D when a depth of consciousness monitor is connected to a channel port of the hub of FIG. 1 . As shown in FIGS. 23A-23C , the hub 100 advantageously roughly bifurcates its display 104 to show various information from the, for example, SEDLine device, commercially available from Masimo Corp. of Irvine, Calif. In FIG. 23D , the hub 100 includes an attached PhaseIn device, commercially available by PHASEIN AB of Sweden, providing, for example, information about the patient's respiration. The hub 100 also includes the SEDLine information, so the hub 100 has divided the display 104 appropriately. In FIG. 23E , temperature and blood pressure sensors communicate with the hub of FIG. 1 and the hub 100 creates display real estate appropriate for the same. In FIG. 23F , an acoustic sensor is also communicating with the hub of FIG. 1 , as well as the forgoing blood pressure and temperature sensor. Accordingly, the hub 100 adjust the display real estate to accommodate the data from each attached device. [0109] The term “and/or” herein has its broadest least limiting meaning which is the disclosure includes A alone, B alone, both A and B together, or A or B alternatively, but does not require both A and B or require one of A or one of B. As used herein, the phrase “at least one of” A, B, and C should be construed to mean a logical A or B or C, using a non-exclusive logical or. [0110] The term “plethysmograph” includes it ordinary broad meaning known in the art which includes data responsive to changes in volume within an organ or whole body (usually resulting from fluctuations in the amount of blood or air it contains). [0111] The following description is merely illustrative in nature and is in no way intended to limit the disclosure, its application, or uses. For purposes of clarity, the same reference numbers will be used in the drawings to identify similar elements. It should be understood that steps within a method may be executed in different order without altering the principles of the present disclosure. [0112] As used herein, the term module may refer to, be part of, or include an Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC); an electronic circuit; a combinational logic circuit; a field programmable gate array (FPGA); a processor (shared, dedicated, or group) that executes code; other suitable components that provide the described functionality; or a combination of some or all of the above, such as in a system-on-chip. The term module may include memory (shared, dedicated, or group) that stores code executed by the processor. [0113] The term code, as used above, may include software, firmware, and/or microcode, and may refer to programs, routines, functions, classes, and/or objects. The term shared, as used above, means that some or all code from multiple modules may be executed using a single (shared) processor. In addition, some or all code from multiple modules may be stored by a single (shared) memory. The term group, as used above, means that some or all code from a single module may be executed using a group of processors. In addition, some or all code from a single module may be stored using a group of memories. [0114] The apparatuses and methods described herein may be implemented by one or more computer programs executed by one or more processors. The computer programs include processor-executable instructions that are stored on a non-transitory tangible computer readable medium. The computer programs may also include stored data. Non-limiting examples of the non-transitory tangible computer readable medium are nonvolatile memory, magnetic storage, and optical storage. Although the foregoing invention has been described in terms of certain preferred embodiments, other embodiments will be apparent to those of ordinary skill in the art from the disclosure herein. Additionally, other combinations, omissions, substitutions and modifications will be apparent to the skilled artisan in view of the disclosure herein. Accordingly, the present invention is not intended to be limited by the reaction of the preferred embodiments, but is to be defined by reference to claims. [0115] Additionally, all publications, patents, and patent applications mentioned in this specification are herein incorporated by reference to the same extent as if each individual publication, patent, or patent application was specifically and individually indicated to be incorporated by reference.

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